"The theaters of the future will be bigger and more beautiful than ever before. They will employ expensive presentation formats that cannot be accessed or reproduced in the home (such as, ironically, film prints). And they will still enjoy exclusivity, as studios relearn the tremendous economic value of the staggered release of their products.

The projects that most obviously lend themselves to such distinctions are spectacles. But if history is any guide, all genres, all budgets will follow. Because the cinema of the future will depend not just on grander presentation, but on the emergence of filmmakers inventive enough to command the focused attention of a crowd for hours.

These new voices will emerge just as we despair that there is nothing left to be discovered. As in the early ’90s, when years of bad multiplexing had soured the public on movies, and a young director named Quentin Tarantino ripped through theaters with a profound sense of cinema’s past and an instinct for reclaiming cinema’s rightful place at the head of popular culture.

Never before has a system so willingly embraced the radical teardown of its own formal standards. But no standards means no rules. Whether photochemical or video-based, a film can now look or sound like anything.

It’s unthinkable that extraordinary new work won’t emerge from such an open structure. That’s the part I can’t wait for.”

Tricksy little theory about the end of INCEPTION. En francais, bien sur.

“Every magic trick consists of three parts, or acts. The first part is called the pledge, the magician shows you something ordinary. The second act is called the turn, the magician takes the ordinary something and makes it into something extraordinary. But you wouldn’t clap yet, because making something disappear isn’t enough. You have to bring it BACK. Now you’re looking for the secret. But you won’t find it because of course, you’re not really looking. You don’t really want to work it out. You want to be fooled.”

“Every magic trick consists of three parts, or acts. The first part is called the pledge, the magician shows you something ordinary. The second act is called the turn, the magician takes the ordinary something and makes it into something extraordinary. But you wouldn’t clap yet, because making something disappear isn’t enough. You have to bring it BACK. Now you’re looking for the secret. But you won’t find it because of course, you’re not really looking. You don’t really want to work it out. You want to be fooled.”

"There’s a hammock made of dreams."

In the argument I had with my brother at Christmas about whether or not the ending of The Dark Knight Rises  was good, I of course shouted “BECAUSE IT’S NOT ENOUGH TO MAKE SOMETHING DISAPPEAR - YOU HAVE TO BRING IT… BACK”

Now available in gif.

(Source: jesuschrist-bale)

Oh so that’s how it went down.

(Source: wednesdaydreams)

This too is directing. From the set of THE DARK KNIGHT.

This too is directing. From the set of THE DARK KNIGHT.

This is directing. From the set of THE DARK KNIGHT RISES.

This is directing. From the set of THE DARK KNIGHT RISES.

Flashback: Mamo on Catwoman

 

When the casting of Anne Hathaway was announced, Mamo did a whole show speculating on The Dark Knight Rises, which is now of course fascinating listening. I’d say we were half right.

Mamo #263: Up, Up, And Away

The Dark Knight rises again! Our last show on The Dark Knight Rises dealt necessarily with serious and troubling events offscreen. We return to the topic of Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy to uphold and celebrate the vast achievements and influences of this genre-defining enterprise, and to look ahead – to Superman, Nightwing, and any other thing that might be waiting in the (bat)wings.