Destroy All Monsters: Expendable Equalizers Walk Among Tombstones

"Die Hard 4 was interesting because it seemed to be a reaction to something. I’m not convinced it was intentional (in fact, given Len Wiseman and Bruce Willis’ respective track records, I’m fairly convinced it was not), but with its focus on Homeland Security, metrosexual digital terrorists, and wayward adult offspring running amuck (from a pissed-off fiftysomething dad’s standpoint, anyway) in the social media age, Die Hard 4 seemed less like a sequel and more like a resurrection.”

I love these movies, or at least, thinking about the wellspring of subordinated patriarchal rage that drives the creation of such things. Live free? Die hard? Who cares? Read more

(Source: explore-blog)

kateoplis:

The Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in Three Years
“A hundred years ago, when Robert Falcon Scott set out for Antarctica on his Terra Nova expedition, his two primary goals were scientific discovery and reaching the geographic South Pole. Arguably, though, Scott was really chasing what contemporary observers call a sufferfest. He set himself up for trouble: Scott brought Manchurian and Siberian ponies that quickly fell through the snow and ice; he planned, in part, for his crew to “man-haul,” meaning that the men would pull sleds full of gear, instead of relying on dogs. Even when Scott’s men faltered, they continued collecting specimens, including rocks. The expedition ended terribly; everybody who made the push to the pole died. Miserable, starving and frostbitten, one of Scott’s last four men killed himself by walking into a blizzard without even bothering to put on his boots.”
“But then there’s Sarah Marquis, who perhaps should be seen as an explorer like Scott, born in the wrong age. She is 42 and Swiss, and has spent three of the past four years walking about 10,000 miles by herself, from Siberia through the Gobi Desert, China, Laos and Thailand, then taking a cargo boat to Brisbane, Australia, and walking across that continent. Along the way, like Scott, she has starved, she has frozen, she has (wo)man-hauled. She has pushed herself at great physical cost to places she wanted to love but ended up feeling, as Scott wrote of the South Pole in his journal: “Great God! This is an awful place.” Despite planning a ludicrous trip, and dying on it, Scott became beloved and, somewhat improbably, hugely respected. Marquis, meanwhile, can be confounding. “You tell people what you’re doing, and they say, ‘You’re crazy,’ ” Marquis told me. “It’s never: ‘Cool project, Sarah! Go for it.’ ” Perhaps this is because the territory Marquis explores is really internal — the nature of fear, the limits of stamina and self-reliance and the meaning of traveling in nature as a female human animal, alone.”
Read on.

This story is incredible.
Her senses sharpened to the point that she could smell shampoo on a tourist’s hair from a mile away. “One day you walk 12 hours, and you don’t feel pain,” Marquis said. The past and present telescope down to an all-consuming now. “There is no before or after. The intellect doesn’t drive you anymore. It doesn’t exist anymore. You become what nature needs you to be: this wild thing.”

kateoplis:

The Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in Three Years

A hundred years ago, when Robert Falcon Scott set out for Antarctica on his Terra Nova expedition, his two primary goals were scientific discovery and reaching the geographic South Pole. Arguably, though, Scott was really chasing what contemporary observers call a sufferfest. He set himself up for trouble: Scott brought Manchurian and Siberian ponies that quickly fell through the snow and ice; he planned, in part, for his crew to “man-haul,” meaning that the men would pull sleds full of gear, instead of relying on dogs. Even when Scott’s men faltered, they continued collecting specimens, including rocks. The expedition ended terribly; everybody who made the push to the pole died. Miserable, starving and frostbitten, one of Scott’s last four men killed himself by walking into a blizzard without even bothering to put on his boots.”

But then there’s Sarah Marquis, who perhaps should be seen as an explorer like Scott, born in the wrong age. She is 42 and Swiss, and has spent three of the past four years walking about 10,000 miles by herself, from Siberia through the Gobi Desert, China, Laos and Thailand, then taking a cargo boat to Brisbane, Australia, and walking across that continent. Along the way, like Scott, she has starved, she has frozen, she has (wo)man-hauled. She has pushed herself at great physical cost to places she wanted to love but ended up feeling, as Scott wrote of the South Pole in his journal: “Great God! This is an awful place.” Despite planning a ludicrous trip, and dying on it, Scott became beloved and, somewhat improbably, hugely respected. Marquis, meanwhile, can be confounding. “You tell people what you’re doing, and they say, ‘You’re crazy,’ ” Marquis told me. “It’s never: ‘Cool project, Sarah! Go for it.’ ” Perhaps this is because the territory Marquis explores is really internal — the nature of fear, the limits of stamina and self-reliance and the meaning of traveling in nature as a female human animal, alone.”

Read on.

This story is incredible.

Her senses sharpened to the point that she could smell shampoo on a tourist’s hair from a mile away. “One day you walk 12 hours, and you don’t feel pain,” Marquis said. The past and present telescope down to an all-consuming now. “There is no before or after. The intellect doesn’t drive you anymore. It doesn’t exist anymore. You become what nature needs you to be: this wild thing.”

ST:TNG:6x13: Aquiel

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“Lt. Aquiel Uhnari.”

The ceaseless romantic tribulations of the perennially hapless Lt. Cmdr. Geordi LaForge reach their dizzying zenith in “Aquiel,” where Geordi falls in love with a dead woman. Who turns out not to be dead. It’s a terrible episode, as boring as they come. At least Geordi gets the girl – although I think she dumps him in the last scene. As with all things love re: Geordi, it’s somewhat hard to tell, and even harder to care.

The writers are trying for a Laura riff here, with Geordi investigating the murder of Lt. Uhnari and “falling in love with her” (though I deeply question the facile nature of the liaison) before she turns up alive and well. The problem is, a film noir gloss requires noirish characters – and Geordi LaForge must be the least hard-bitten adult male in the history of television.

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The Dew Over Episode 18 – Best Picture: 1986

A long way getting from stage to screen, I think I started my homework for the 1986 episode of thedewover sometime in May, recorded the episode in the summer, recorded a 1984 episode a couple months later that referred to the 1986 episode relentlessly without the latter having been posted yet, and now here it is: Best Picture, 1986, the year of A Room With A View, Hannah and Her Sisters, The Mission, Children of a Lesser God, and the astonishing Platoon

blockhead33:

Giger is by far one of my favorite artists, there is not one piece of work of his that I have seen that has not inspired me. If iv learned anything from his work its that there is nothing wrong with being dark, or delving into the dark side of ones mind. Stare long and hard into that abyss, and when it stares back at you, make IT flinch 

All from my board on Pintrest http://pinterest.com/thedoctor033/dark-side/

interface-2037:


“The beast is done. Cooked. I got lucky meeting [the late H.R. Giger] all those years ago. It’s very hard to repeat that. I just happen to be the one who forced it through because they said it’s obscene. They didn’t want to do it and I said, ‘I want to do it, it’s fantastic’. But after four [‘Alien’ movies] (he has conveniently forgotten the ‘AvP’ movies), I think it wears out a little bit. There’s only so much snarling you can do. I think you’ve got to come back with something more interesting. And I think we’ve found the next step. I thought the Engineers were quite a good start.”

Ridley Scott, when asked about xenomorphs making a comeback for his sequel, P A R A D I S E.

I’m lonely in my opinion on this but I agree with Scott completely, especially given that it follows the line of Paradise (and Prometheus) being tangents of the original Alien series, not prequels proper. The xenomorph has been done, and while I think it’s nearly impossible to conceive of a differing approach that will produce the same result, I’d much rather see Scott try, than see the kind of fan-wanking that the final sequence of Prometheus represents.

interface-2037:

“The beast is done. Cooked. I got lucky meeting [the late H.R. Giger] all those years ago. It’s very hard to repeat that. I just happen to be the one who forced it through because they said it’s obscene. They didn’t want to do it and I said, ‘I want to do it, it’s fantastic’. But after four [‘Alien’ movies] (he has conveniently forgotten the ‘AvP’ movies), I think it wears out a little bit. There’s only so much snarling you can do. I think you’ve got to come back with something more interesting. And I think we’ve found the next step. I thought the Engineers were quite a good start.”

Ridley Scott, when asked about xenomorphs making a comeback for his sequel, P A R A D I S E.

I’m lonely in my opinion on this but I agree with Scott completely, especially given that it follows the line of Paradise (and Prometheus) being tangents of the original Alien series, not prequels proper. The xenomorph has been done, and while I think it’s nearly impossible to conceive of a differing approach that will produce the same result, I’d much rather see Scott try, than see the kind of fan-wanking that the final sequence of Prometheus represents.

(Source: argography)

The Ontological Hell of Daniel Cockburn’s You Are Here Blu-Ray

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"I mean, the thing is that you spend… you know, you spend enough time doing something, and you focus for long enough, you know, on every little detail, then you start to lose sight of the… uh… uh…"

Daniel Cockburn gave me a blu-ray of his film, You Are Here. It is, I believe, four years overdue. Unless I miss my guess You Are Here played in the Toronto International Film Festival in 2010, i.e. before the festival adopted “You Are Here” as its slogan and You Are Here's maze of twisty little poster designs as one of its ad images, i.e. when You Are Here merely played at the festival, and before it became the festival.

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